Joe Biden says Trump’s refusal to concede defeat ‘an embarrassment’ – live | US news

WHAT IS TRUMP CHALLENGING?

The Trump campaign has filed more than a dozen lawsuits in at least five states.

In Pennsylvania, the campaign has challenged the state Supreme Court ruling allowing election officials to accept mail-in ballots up to three days after the election as long as they were postmarked on Election Day. Trump has also sued over campaign observers allegedly being blocked from witnessing vote tallying in Pennsylvania. And he’s challenged the secretary of state instructing counties that voters whose absentee ballots were rejected could cast a provisional ballot.

Trump has won one victory so far: A state court ruled his campaign observers had to be allowed closer to the actual vote counting. That ruling had no impact on the outcome of the race.

Four other lawsuits filed by the campaign have been dismissed. Others are pending.

On Monday, his campaign sued to force Pennsylvania not to certify the results of the election altogether. The 85-page lawsuit itself contained no evidence of voter fraud, other than a smattering of allegations such as an election worker in Chester County altering “over-voted” ballots by changing votes that had been marked for Trump to another candidate.

Top Democratic leaders in the state accused Trump of trying to disenfranchise voters and overturn an election he lost.

WHAT ARE TRUMP’S ALLIES SAYING?

Trump’s lawyers and campaign staff say the election is not over and that they are investigating claims in several states, though they continue to lack any evidence of widespread fraud that affected the outcome of the race. Top Republicans have supported the president’s efforts to fight the election results in court.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Trump was “100% within his rights to look into allegations of irregularities and weigh his legal options.” Attorney General William Barr authorized the Justice Department to investigate “clear and apparently-credible allegations of irregularities.”

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

All disputes over the counts in each state must be complete by Dec. 8. Members of the Electoral College vote on Dec. 14. The U.S. House and Senate hold a joint session on Jan. 6, 2021, to count the electoral votes in each state.